NCGG New Faculty and Promotions

Monday, Sep 14, 2020
New Faculty

 

Layna Mosley has joined the department as professor of politics and international affairs. In July 2020, Professor Mosley became a member of the Niehaus Center for Globalization and Governance’s Executive Committee. Previously, she was a professor in the politics department at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Mosley focuses on the politics of the global economy, as well as international relations more broadly. She investigates the connections between domestic politics and the global economy. Mosley received a Ph.D. in political science from Duke University in 1999. 

Guadalupe Tuñón has joined the department as assistant professor of politics and international affairs. In July 2020, Professor Tuñón became an associated faculty member of the Niehaus Center for Globalization and Governance. Before coming to Princeton, Tuñón was an academy scholar at Harvard University’s Weatherhead Center for International Affairs, as well as a predoctoral fellow at the Identity & Conflict Lab at the University of Pennsylvania and the Center for the Study of Religion and Society at the University of Notre Dame. She focuses on comparative politics and political economy with a regional focus on Latin America. Tuñón earned a Ph.D. in political science from the University of California, Berkeley, in 2019.

Promotions

Rafaela Dancygier has been promoted to professor of politics and international affairs. Professor Dancygier is a faculty associate of the Niehaus Center for Globalization and Governance. Previously, she served as associate professor from 2016-20, as assistant professor from 2008-2016, and as an instructor from 2007-2008. Dancygier specializes in comparative politics, with a focus on the implications of ethnic diversity in advanced democracies. She earned a Ph.D. in political science from Yale University in 2007.

Matias Iaryczower has been promoted to professor of politics. Professor Iaryczower is a faculty associate of the Niehaus Center for Globalization and Governance. Previously, he served the department as associate professor from 2015-20 and assistant professor from 2010-15. From 2005-10, he was an assistant professor of economics at the California Institute of Technology. His research uses game theory and empirical methods to study how institutions and strategic considerations shape collective decision-making in courts, legislatures, and elections. He earned a Ph.D. from the University of California, Los Angeles in 2005.